Third Gift Brings Total MASTERPIECE Trust contribution to $1.5 million

 

San Diego– San Diego developer and philanthropist Conrad Prebys has recommitted major support for KPBS and the MASTERPIECE Trust with a third gift of $500,000. Prebys’ gift to The MASTERPIECE Trust will benefit both MASTERPIECE and KPBS.  Since 2012, Prebys has donated $1.5 million to the MASTERPIECE Trust – $750,000 staying in San Diego for KPBS.

The MASTERPIECE Trust is a fundraising initiative in collaboration with PBS stations across the nation. Half of Prebys’ gift will be granted to KPBS and will support local programming in San Diego.  The other half will go directly to the Trust for investment in the series’ future.

“We are incredibly grateful for all Mr. Prebys has done and continues to do for KPBS and MASTERPIECE,” said KPBS General Manager Tom Karlo. “Due in large part to Mr. Prebys’ generosity, KPBS has been able to create more programming devoted to local news, arts and the San Diego culture. We are honored to have his support for local public media.”

“I read four newspapers every day,” says Conrad Prebys.  “The first thing I do every morning is look up KPBS and see what’s on MASTERPIECE.  With this knowledge, I look forward to the great programming I will watch in the evening.”

Established after MASTERPIECE’s 40th Anniversary in 2011, The MASTERPIECE Trust creates an opportunity for donors and families to help provide a future for the renowned series. The Trust was initiated by WGBH Boston, where MASTERPIECE is produced. Currently the longest-running primetime drama on American television, MASTERPIECE is the series that left millions of viewers in suspense last February with the season finale of Downton Abbey.

“I am such an admirer of Mr. Prebys for all the work he has done for the city of San Diego,” says MASTERPIECE Executive Producer Rebecca Eaton.  “We are grateful for his generous support of MASTERPIECE and of our ongoing partnership with KPBS.”

Since its inception, the MASTERPIECE Trust has raised $6,880,000 with nearly $4 million from San Diego philanthropists.

Donors interested in contributing to The MASTERPIECE Trust should contact Ellen Frank, Director of Major Gifts at WGBH (617-300-3809ellen_frank@wgbh.org) or Trina Hester, Assistant General Manager of Development at KPBS (619-594-2104 or trhester@kpbs.org).

About KPBS

KPBS serves the San Diego region with news and entertainment programming that respects our audience with inspiring, intelligent and enlightening content. KPBS will deliver this content via multiple outlets, including television, radio, and digital media and will adapt and remain relevant in a rapidly changing world.

KPBS values integrity, truth, transparency and lifelong learning. We strive to engage with our citizens and showcase the unique neighborhoods and people that make our community thrive.

As a public service of San Diego State University, education is a core value – from our children’s programming to our local news coverage.

KPBS is committed to being a reliable source for in-depth, thoughtful, and high quality content.

 About MASTERPIECE

MASTERPIECE on PBS is presented by WGBH Boston. Rebecca Eaton is executive producer. Funding for MASTERPIECE is provided by Viking Cruises and Ralph Lauren Corporation with additional support from public television viewers and contributors to The MASTERPIECE Trust, created to help ensure the series’ future. Visit pbs.org/masterpiece for more information about the series.

 About WGBH

WGBH Boston is the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the Web, including MASTERPIECE, Antiques Roadshow, Frontline, Nova, American Experience, Arthur, Curious George, and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle, and children’s series.

WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or visually impaired.

Ronnie Cook
Ronnie Cook

Ronnie is has been telling stories with images, film, video and words for over 40 years.